This July 24, 2016 photo provided by Niels Alpert, Amanda Friedland, left, surrounded by friends and family adjusts her friend Betsy Davis's sash as she lays on a bed during her "Right To Die Party" in Ojai, Calif. In early July, Davis emailed her closest friends and family to invite them to a two-day celebration, telling them: "These circumstances are unlike any party you have attended before, requiring emotional stamina, centeredness, and openness. And one rule: No crying."  (Niels Alpert via AP)

This July 24, 2016 photo provided by Niels Alpert, Amanda Friedland, left, surrounded by friends and family adjusts her friend Betsy Davis’s sash as she lays on a bed during her “Right To Die Party” in Ojai, Calif. In early July, Davis emailed her closest friends and family to invite them to a two-day celebration, telling them: “These circumstances are unlike any party you have attended before, requiring emotional stamina, centeredness, and openness. And one rule: No crying.” (Niels Alpert via AP)

Betsy Davis, 41, became one of the first Californians to make use a new state law allowing doctor-assisted suicide. Four other states have such laws, with Oregon the first in 1997.

Davis shared her plans with her guests, giving them a detailed schedule for the weekend that included the hour she planned to slip into a coma.

There were cocktails. There was pizza from her favorite local joint. There was a screening of one of her favorite movies. And then her friends said their goodbyes and left.

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