Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs Installs Rotating Sculptures in Freedom Park

Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs Installs Rotating Sculptures in Freedom Park

ATLANTA—Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs—in partnership with the Department of Parks and Recreation—installed eight sculptures as an initiative of the ELEVATE arts festival in Freedom Park. The artworks are displayed in Freedom Park along the east-west section between Highland Avenue and the Beltline intersection and will remain for one year. The City’s Temporary Sculpture Program was initiated in 2009 and seeks to provide exposure to art and artists while providing dynamic cultural amenities in Atlanta. The featured sculptors are Gabi Madrid, David Landis, Sara Santamaria, Tony Loadholt, Phil Proctor, Julia Hill and Andrew Crawford. In an effort to support a contemporary art collection that reflects the diversity of the urban environment, the City will provide new opportunities for Atlanta artists to display public sculptures at Freedom Park on an annual basis.

“The Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs is honored to bring this collection of sculptural offerings to Freedom Park with our rotating art program. Atlanta is home to many public art creatives of singular vision and our new initiative will showcase their talents and commitment to beautifying public parks and spaces,” said Camille Russell Love, Executive Director of the City of Atlanta’s.

The City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs’ vision is to enhance the quality of life through arts and culture, and to contribute positively to the social and economic health of Atlanta and the region. Their mission is to promote rich, diverse and educational cultural experiences; nurture artists and arts organizations; preserve and protect the city’s culture; and expand Atlanta’s international reputation. The ELEVATE Atlanta Public Art Festival is a program of the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

 

Freedom Park

Freedom Park has become Atlanta’s most connected park, linking together seven of the city’s most historic and desirable neighborhoods—Candler Park, Little Five Points, Inman Park, Old Fourth Ward, Ponce-Highland, Virginia Highlands, Druid Hills, and Lake Claire. Located at the intersection of Moreland Ave and North Ave in Atlanta, Georgia, Freedom Park’s 200+ acres boast eight miles of gently curving paths for walking, jogging, and bicycling.  Freedom Park is also designated as the city’s art park and has culturally important public artworks on display throughout the park.

Freedom Park is aptly book-ended by National Parks sites dedicated to Jimmy Carter and Martin Luther King Jr., two American treasures and national leaders, both awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace. The park overlays the first completed section of the Atlanta Beltline, connecting community business and neighborhood assets with ease.

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