SCFG Announces 42nd Sickle Cell 5K Road Race/Walk 

SCFG Announces 42nd Sickle Cell 5K Road Race/Walk 

Event takes place in historic downtown East Point on Saturday, September 10 

Theme: Let’s Groove Together, One Step at a Time! 

Register today at www.sicklecellrace.com 

 

The Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia, Inc. (SCFG) is pleased to announce that the 42nd Sickle Cell Race/Walk will take place in person on Saturday, September 10, 2022, in beautiful downtown East Point on a new 5K route. Kickoff starts at 9AM. 

The annual charity event benefits Camp New Hope, a weeklong summer camp for kids and teens living with sickle cell disease. It is through Camp New Hope that campers are able to enjoy an outdoor enriching adventure while learning self-help sickle cell management skills and positive image development in a medically supervised environment. 

 

Our goal is to raise $100,000 in community support to continue and expand our summer tradition that has been enjoyed by countless numbers of children each year.  

 

“For more than 40 years this race has been the catalyst that brings us together as a community in the quest to improve the lives of those living with sickle cell disease, and we are thrilled to be back and in person after a two-year hiatus during the pandemic,” said SCFG Executive Director Tabatha McGee.  

 

During the 42nd Sickle Cell 5K Race/Walk, as a bonus, sickle cell testing will be offered through the SCFG’s mobile Health Hub unit at the race site. 

 

This popular charity race is recognized as one of Georgia’s consecutively running road races. Since its inception, the Georgia Sickle Cell Race has supported the Foundation and its sickle cell-related activities. The city of East Point, Fulton County Government, WSB Television, and the American Red Cross have supported this charity race/walk for many years. 

 

The annual sickle cell road race/walk was launched over four decades ago in conjunction with the South Fulton Running Partners, Inc. — one of the nation’s premier African American track clubs.  

 

The 2022 top three finishers in the male and female categories will be awarded a plaque and a prize, including an 11-inch Apple iPad Pro, a 55-inch flat screen color television or a $125 Visa Gift Card. 

 

All participants in the 42nd Sickle Cell 5K Road Race/Walk will receive a finisher’s medal and a certificate of completion. 

 

Early Bird registration opens Monday and ends June 30. Just enter the word “Early Bird” for a $5 discount. Register at  www.sicklecellrace.com.  

 

About SCFG 

                                                                               

SCFG is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit advocating for and serving children and adults with sickle cell and other abnormal hemoglobin. SCFG offers affordable mobile and in-person adult medical services, sickle cell testing, specialized care coordination, educational opportunities, and food assistance to clients.  

  

Today, African Americans and other people of color are disproportionately impacted by sickle cell disease (SCD) which unfortunately is characterized by pain episodes and severe organ damage. More than 100,000 Americans suffer from the blood disorder including more than 14,300 Georgia – the 4th largest population in the nation. 

 

About Camp New Hope 

 

Camp New Hope is a seven-day, six-night residential camp for children ages 7-17 with sickle cell disease. The campers who come from across the southeastern U.S. explore various interests, including swimming, canoeing, tennis, climbing, and arts and crafts.  

“Camp New Hope” was coined by one of the youths attending the camp in 1993. Camp New Hope strives to provide visions of hope for children living with sickle cell disease by utilizing counselors and other staff living with sickle cell disease and succeeding in life. Though a medically supervised camp, Camp New Hope focuses its efforts on the children, not the disease, as a deliberate effort to help campers experience and understand that though impacted by sickle cell disease, they are not defined by the disease they live with. 

Comments

From the Web