EAA Schools show significant growth in student achievement over last six months

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    The Education Achievement Authority of Michigan (EAA) recently announced the student assessment results, which showed significant growth in students and proved that the student-centered learning approach is working.

    “The scores are phenomenal and impressive. Students have responded enthusiastically to the new blended, student-centered approach to education,” said EAA Chancellor Dr. John Wm. Covington. “They are showing they want to learn and can learn given the right environment. They are closing the educational gap.”

    The tests, administered in late April and early May in the 12 direct-run EAA schools, show that 56 percent of students already have achieved one or more year’s growth in reading and 44 percent have achieved two or more years’ growth. In math, 65 percent of students achieved one full year’s growth, and 48 percent achieved two full years’ growth.

    These scores are an increase from the growth experienced by students in the earlier tests administered in late January and early February when 27 percent of students had achieved one or more year’s growth in reading and 22 percent in mathematics.

    The most significant growth in reading at the high school level came at Central Collegiate Academy; where reading proficiency scores show that 62 percent of students have already achieved two or more years’ growth. The most significant growth at the elementary/middle level came at Nolan Elementary/Middle School, where 36 percent of students had achieved two or more years’ growth in reading whilst 23 percent having achieved between one and two year’s growth.

    The most significant growth in mathematics performance at the high school level was also at Central where 84 percent of students tested achieved two or more years’ growth, and another 2 percent had a full year’s growth by the end of April. Phoenix Multicultural Academy had the most significant growth at the elementary/middle school level with 48 percent of students achieving two or more years’ growth and an additional 25 percent having achieved between one and two years’ growth.

    A year’s growth is equivalent to the number of skills a student learns in a traditional school year as determined by a national sample.

    “Students are making gains every day, some on small levels and others on greater levels,” said Mary Esselman, Deputy Chancellor, Instructional Support and Instructional Accountability.

    “My daughter and I both love her school, Nolan Elementary/Middle School,” said parent volunteer Sheri Stovall. “I have watched my daughter achieve so much this year. Her reading test scores have skyrocketed and she loves to read all the time now. With the student-centered learning model, she gets to keep moving up in levels when she masters the material so she hasn’t been getting bored or losing focus, which helps her achieve even more.”

    Esselman said that many parents and students are thrilled with the outcome of student-centered learning.

    “My math and reading scores have improved and it makes me feel like I’m really learning,” said Jordan Cook, 11, a student at Brenda Scott Elementary/Middle School. “I like being able to work at my own pace.”
    “We are able to continue adjusting their learning plans according to their learning needs so that each student continues to experience gains,” Esselman said. “We are projecting that the majority of students will be on target to have closed their achievement gap by one year or more by June. We are especially pleased that no student will fail; students, in large part because of the extended school year, will continue to work toward mastery and growth.

    “The schools admitted into the EAA were in the lowest of the 5 percent of Persistently Lowest Achieving schools in the State,” Covington added. “This new data shows that these students now are learning. These schools have gone from a pattern of failing children to educating children. Students are catching up. We are working to get as many students at grade level and to make sure students who need more time are getting the attention needed.”

    Students achieving gains in individual growth in the 12 direct run EAA schools are as follows:

    Reading 2 yrs or more 1.5 years 1 year Total 1 yr
    Elementary/Middle growth growth growth or more
    Brenda Scott Elem/Middle 39% 8% 10% 57%
    Burns Elem/Middle School 26% 7% 7% 42%
    Law Academy 43% 5% 6% 55%
    Mary M. Bethune Elem/Middle 31% 6% 11% 49%
    Nolan Elem/Middle School 36% 9% 14% 59%
    Phoenix Multicultural Academy 40% 6% 7% 53%

    High School
    Central Collegiate Academy 62% 2% 0% 64%
    Denby High School 47% 2% 2% 51%
    Henry Ford High School 52% 3% 2% 57%
    Mumford High School 43% 3% 2% 48%
    Pershing High School 54% 1% 1% 56%
    Southeastern High School 50% 2% 2% 54%

    Math 2 yr or more 1.5 year 1 year Total 1 yr
    Elementary/Middle growth growth growth or more
    Brenda Scott Elem/Middle 37% 11% 15% 63%
    Burns Elem/Middle School 26% 9% 15% 50%
    Law Academy 33% 12% 12% 57%
    Mary M. Bethune Elem/Middle 33% 9% 13% 55%
    Nolan Elem/Middle School 25% 11% 16% 52%
    Phoenix Multicultural Academy 48% 9% 16% 73%

    High School
    Central Collegiate Academy 84% 1% 1% 86%
    Denby High School 67% 3% 1% 71%
    Henry Ford High School 64% 4% 3% 71%
    Mumford High School 64% 2% 2% 68%
    Pershing High School 68% 2% 3% 73%
    Southeastern High School 61% 3% 3% 67%
     

    Read more http://www.michronicleonline.com/index.php/news-briefs-original/11956-eaa-schools-show-significant-growth-in-student-achievement-over-last-six-months

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