On Education, Georgia Lawmakers Make Few Major Changes

    Comments:  | Leave A Comment

    schoolbooks.jpg
    State lawmakers made few major changes to education policy during this year’s legislative session. Bills to empower parents and teachers to convert failing public schools into charter schools stalled in committee. So did a measure to change state curriculum standards.

    Instead, lawmakers lowered the grade-point average requirements so more people would qualify for the popular HOPE grant program for technical college students. They also expanded a student scholarship program that has drawn some questions about transparency and effectiveness.

    Perhaps the biggest change was the standardization of teacher evaluations based, in part, on student performance.

    The bill, sponsored by Rep. Randy Nix, R-LaGrange, calls for each local school district and all charter schools to implement an evaluation system to be defined by the state Board of Education. Nix said it was based on a state pilot program and included input from superintendents, principals and teachers.

    Under the bill, student performance will comprise at least 50 percent of the evaluation for teachers who teach courses that are part of annual state tests.

    ”It not only fundamentally changes how the teachers and principals will be evaluated but how those evaluations will be used,” said Angela Palm, director of policy and legislative services for the Georgia School Boards Association.

    The bill is under review by the governor.

    Separately, the governor is expected to sign legislation restoring a lower GPA requirement for students seeking HOPE grants to attend the state’s technical colleges. Two years ago, lawmakers raised the grade-point average to 3.0 because of a decline in lottery revenues that fund the HOPE program. In the years since, there was a notable decline in enrollment.

    The plan returns the qualifying GPA to 2.0.

    Supporters say an increase in lottery revenues allows for the change and the move will benefit several thousand students at an estimated total cost of $5 million to $8 million annually.

    The student scholarship program that was expanded helps children attend private schools. It is funded through donations from individuals and corporations who, in turn, are eligible for a tax break.

    Among those bills that stalled in committee was the proposed ”Parent and Teacher Empowerment Act,” which lets parents and teachers petition a local school board to convert a failing public school into a charter school. The so-called parent trigger bill would have also compelled a failing public school to implement certain measures, possibly removing all school personnel to improve performance.

    A bill that would have allowed students with a license to carry a gun to take their firearms onto parts of public colleges and universities also failed to come up for a final vote. The university system chancellor and the Board of Regents opposed the plan, although it’s likely to resurface next year.

    Tags: »

    Comments

    blog comments powered by Disqus
    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 189 other followers